Skip to main content

Integer Ideas

I haven't had the opportunity to teach much about integers, or about how to add or subtract positive and negative integers, but I might get the chance this year. It isn't in our current curriculum, so it's an extra topic that we don't normally get to spend time on. However, we will be teaching integer concepts next year, as we work on Common Core implementation....and maybe, just maybe, we'll get to work on some integer concepts at the end of this year.

Even though I don't get to teach this topic, I do have a large number line with positive and negative numbers posted in my room, with the hope that the kids will observe it and think about it. And, from time to time, when we talk about the idea that the Commutative Property does NOT work for subtraction, we will refer to the number line (that I have to be on tiptoe to reach!) to see that a problem like 7-2 = 5, but 2-7 = -5. So, we do have that visual to discuss from time to time.


In preparation for next year (and this year, just in case), I created an Integer Operations Footloose activity, and as I was searching for hands-on activities, I also found a great number line idea on Pinterest (page no longer found.). Students can walk on the number line - I would think this would help students get a better understanding of moving in the positive and negative directions. I really hope I get to use it! If I can't use it at school, maybe I can use it with my daughter this summer.....she still struggles with adding and subtracting negatives and positives.

What are some good memory tricks to help students learn the rules of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing integers?






















Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Memory Wheels - First Day, Last Day, and Any Day in Between!

This post has been moved to:  http://www.cognitivecardiowithmsmm.com/blog/memory-wheels-first-day-last-day-and-any-day-in-between

Math Class - First Day Activity

Rectangle of pentominoes Many 6th graders seem to have a pretty negative attitude about math, so I try to do something interesting to "grab" them during our first class. Last year, during the first math class, we spent part of the period working with pentominoes. Before working with the pentominoes, however, we played a name game so we could learn each others' names (I find it impossible to start anything else if I don't know some names, and fortunately, I learn them fairly quickly). rectangle outline For the activity, I divided the students into groups of 3 or 4. The directions for the activity were not complicated - the task was to make a rectangle, using all of the pentominoes. I gave students an outline of the rectangle, as pictured to the left, so they would know the correct size of the rectangle. The squares in the grid are each one inch. The rectangle is 5 squares (inches) wide and 13 inches long (13 inches includes the row that has the "Pent

How Much Math Homework??

I am very curious about math homework in middle school, from a teacher perspective:     How much math homework do you give?     What kind of homework do you give?     How do you go over it in class? Let me explain why I ask these questions. I have taught 6th grade math for eight years, and every year, my goal is to "perfect" the homework issue. My basic issue is that I feel that I spend too much time going over it (not necessarily every day, but often). In the past, we have reviewed homework in the following ways:    1. going over answers as a class    2. self-checking answers that are on the board and sharing any questions    3. partner-checking and then verifying    4. choosing only a few problems to check When I taught elementary school (for 12 years), I never seemed to have this problem....we had 60 minutes for class and I never struggled to fit everything in. But at middle school, we have 44 minutes (minus time to switch for classes), and I just haven't fo